3 actions you can take right now for women’s rights #IWD2018

International Women’s Day is a day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women.

Here at Fair Agenda, we think the best way to celebrate and honour International Women's Day, and the achievements of the women who have fought for our rights is by continuing their work.
So here are three of our tips for actions you can take right now, for a fair and equal future.

1. Listen to, and amplify, the voices of women in public debate

Particularly women whose voices might be marginalised because of other parts of their identity – like Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, Muslim women, women of colour, women living with a disability and LGBTQI women.
You can get started right now is by following more women (and women-led groups) on social media, and actively sharing their posts. We’ve put together a list of some of our favourites to help you get started:
  • Nakkiah Lui is a writer, actor and social commentator. You may know her from her (multiple) TV shows, or from the podcast she co-hosts with Miranda Tapsell ‘Pretty for an Aboriginal’. Follow her on twitter.
  • Celeste Liddle is an Arrernte woman who you may know as ‘Black Feminist Ranter’ on facebook. Celeste is a writer, union organiser and commentator, and today she’s written a great piece called “International Women’s Day is a call to action, not a branding opportunity’. Follow her on: Facebook, twitter.
  • Mariam Veiszadeh is a lawyer, diversity and inclusion consultant. She was Daily Life’s Woman of the Year in 2016. Follow her on facebook, twitter.
  • Carly Findlay is a writer, speaker, disability and appearance activist. Follow her on: Facebook, twitter.
  • Jordan Raskopoulos is an Australian comedian best known as the frontwoman for the comedy group The Axis of Awesome, and a champion for LGBTIQ equality. Follow her on: Facebook, twitter.
  • Sam Connor is a human and disability rights activist and cofounder of bolshy divas and criparmy. Follow her on twitter.
  • Jamila Rizvi is a columnist, radio host, and author (including of the excellent book 'Not Just Lucky'). Follow her on facebook, twitter.
  • Marita Cheng is the founder of RoboGals, champion of Women in STEM and a former Young Australian of the Year. Follow her on facebook, twitter.
  • Women with Disabilities Australia are a national group working to improve the lives and life chances of women with disabilities. Follow them on: Facebook.
  • Djirra (formerly Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention & Legal Service) are champions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by family violence and sexual assault. Follow them on: Facebook, twitter.
  • Fair Agenda is a community of Australians campaigning for women’s rights. On social media we let you know how you can drive change on issues in the headlines; plus share highlights on what’s happening in the fight for women’s rights around the country (and the globe). Follow us on facebook, twitter.


2. Add your support to campaigns for women’s rights

Systemic, structural change doesn’t come easy. To achieve a fair and equal future for women we’re going to have to fight hard every step of the way (and be ready to stop those who want to pull us backwards).
Critical to success in almost every campaign for political and social change is public support – and a first step to showing yours is by signing petitions to decision-makers, supporting calls for action.
Here are two campaigns that need your support right now:


3. Donate to enable women-led organisations to keep winning long-term change

The work that goes into changing the policies that shape women’s lives is long and hard. And it takes money. Unsurprisingly, the gender pay gap doesn’t disappear when it comes to the people with capacity to give big donations - which can make it really hard to raise funds for women’s rights work.
That’s why one of the most important ways you can have impact is by donating to support the work of women and women-led organisations that are working for systemic change.
Here are a couple we recommend:
  • Fair Agenda drives and wins campaigns for systemic change. In just the past few years our community has won change that has already improved more than 100,000 women’s lives. Including: securing $100 million of additional funding for family violence response, preventing cuts to working parents’ time to care for their newborns from hurting 79,000 families every year; and working with partners to stop $34 million of cuts to the vital work of community legal centres, and much more. Now we need your help to power big fights to secure action on campus sexual assault; and to pass laws for safe and legal access to abortion in Queensland. Click here to donate.
  • In tackling the issue of family violence, the work of Djirra (previously Family Violence Prevention Legal Services) couldn’t be more important. They provide a specialist and culturally safe service to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, who are 32 times more likely to be victims of family violence than non-Aboriginal women. They: draw on cultural strength to increase resilience, reduce social isolation and vulnerability to family violence, promote healthy relationship and create awareness about the ‘power and control’ dynamics of family violence and red flags. They also deliver campaigns to make sure Aboriginal women’s voices are heard. Make a donation here.
Any contribution you can make is important – but if you’re able we strongly encourage you to set up a regular donation. Predictable, reliable income can make a huge difference in the capacity of organisation’s to focus their energy on responding in the most critical and strategic moments, instead of having to fundraise first. (You can set up a monthly donation to power Fair Agenda’s campaigns for women’s rights here).

PS - To secure the advances we need to ensure all women’s safety, equality and dignity, we need to organise year round. Fair Agenda is a community of 37,000 Australians who use our collective people power to win change on issues that affect women year round. If you aren’t a member already, please join us today.